“The test of good manners is to be patient with bad ones.” – Gabirol

Challenging rude behavior in an interview can be a tricky situation.  Everyone has the right to stand up for their right to be treated fairly and politely.  We’ll go over some ways to handle rude interviewer behavior.

Vanna, if you please . . .

1.  Politely wait for the interruption to finish.  Ultimately, eye-rolling and hot air puffing isn’t going to accomplish anything. 

2.  Sincerely accept the apology that the hiring manager SHOULD be offering and move on.  It’s very easy to make a joke of the situation, but make sure you are finding the humor of the situation instead of being passive-aggressive.   

3.  Keep your wits about you.  I know it’s hard to regroup, especially when you’re on a great riff about why they should hire you, but put a mental bookmark in your answer so you can pick up where you left off.  Also, do not let any anger seep through into your answers.  Is it okay to be treated this way?  No.  However, as stated in point one, getting upset isn’t going to solve the situation.    

4.  Say something.  If repeated interruptions keep happening or a hiring manager is flat-out ignoring you to finish another task, politely speak up.  Keep it professional, though.  A simple, “If there is a more convenient time to meet, we can reschedule for a later date.” will work.  Usually, this type of statement will, essentially, embarrass the interviewer into straightening up and flying right.  If they don’t, take it as a good sign they are a bad company to work for. 

5.  End the interview.  Caution:  This is only in cases of extreme interviewer behavior!  If you have been left for a significant amount of time (I would say 20-30 minutes or more) or the conversations involving the interruptions is significantly inappropriate (Think swearing or hostile talk) then it’s time to put an end to the foolishness.  Don’t just get up and leave.  Don’t give them the satisfaction of saying, “He/she just left?  How rude!”  Let them know, “This appears to be a very busy day for you.  I appreciate your time, but this position no longer seems to be a fit for me.”  If the hiring manager isn’t available to talk to then let the receptionist know. 

It’s a hiring manager’s job market out there, which can lead to the belief it’s alright to treat people this way because there will be some foolish sap who will allow it.  You don’t want to burn any bridges and, sometimes, an interview does have a full plate.  However, your time is valuable, as well, so there is no point in continuing to waste it at the hands of an inept hiring manager.

Positive Thought of the Day:

“Whoever one is, and wherever one is, one is always in the wrong if one is rude.” – Maurice Baring

Advertisements

“People count up the faults of those who keep them waiting.” – French Proverb

Interviews are essentially meetings between a hiring manager and an applicant.  If you were leading a meeting within your company, you wouldn’t consistently interrupt the itinerary to take personal calls or answer e-mails, would you? 

Just because you are in a position to hire someone does not mean you are in the position to make people wait while you are continually interrupted.  An applicant’s time is still important and engaging in this type of behavior is not only rude, it reflects poorly on your organizational style and the company culture. 

Today we will go over how to prevent interruptions if you are conducting interviews.  Next time we will cover how to handle this type of situation if you are an applicant. 

So, Vanna, if you please . . .

 1. Nip interruptions in the bud.  Turn your cell phone on silent, your office phone down to a lower volume or to Do Not Disturb, and, if space allows, conduct the interview away from your computer so you won’t be tempted to peek at your computer. 

 2.  If you are in a position where you receive a high volume of communication from your team, i.e. a lot of phone calls or continuous drop-ins from co-workers, then send out communication letting people know you will be indisposed from such-and-such time and you will be able to respond to their concerns before or after your interview(s).

3.  Sometimes some people can’t take a hint.  Quite often people assume their problem so important that it’s okay for them to pop their head in your door for your $0.02.  Politely, but firmly let them know you will contact them as soon as the interview is over.  No need to embarrass the person, but don’t let them launch into a filibuster about their issue.  A quick, “I’m in the middle of an interview right now, but I will touch base with you by ______.”  You don’t want to freak out the interviewee into thinking it’s going to be a marathon interview or that it will take 2.8 seconds to realize you’re not going to hire him/her.  However, giving a timeframe will, hopefully, avoid incessant follow-up. 

4.  If you are in the middle of a time-sensitive project or a position immediate attention really is warranted, reach out to a co-worker who would be able to make a decision on your behalf.  Make sure you pick someone whose judgment you trust and is in the position to make any necessary decisions. 

5.  Know your schedule.  If there is a long-standing meeting every Monday morning or payroll runs the last week of every month, avoid scheduling interviews during or around that time.

6.  Sometimes interruptions are unavoidable.  Kids are sick at home.  You’re short-staffed, which is why you’re hiring.  If you honestly and truly cannot avoid interruptions during an interview, give the applicant a heads up at the beginning of the interview.  You don’t need to give a blow-by-blow account of your kid’s tonsillitis or don’t use this as an opportunity to complain about how busy you are.  A simple, “I certainly don’t want to interrupt your flow of thought during the interview, but if my phone rings, I may have to take the call. I will keep it brief so we can get back on track.” 

As an interviewer, you are an ambassador of where you work.  Make sure you are putting your best foot forward.  People want to work for your company.  Don’t dissuade that desire by exhibiting rude behavior. 

Positive Thought of the Day:

“Good manners are just a way of showing other people that we have respect for them.” – Bill Kelly

“Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?” – Edgar Bergen

Happy Tuesday, Friends!  More bad interviewer behavior is on its way, but I just wanted to brighten your cubicle. 

 

Positive Thought of the Day:

“Thanks to Toby I have a very strong prejudice against Human Resources. I believe that the department is a breeding ground for monsters. What I failed to consider though is that not all monsters are bad, like ET. Is Holly our extra-terrestrial? Maybe. Or maybe she’s just an awesome woman from this planet.” – Michael Scott, The Office

“Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.” – Peter Drucker

What’s worse than having to go through the heartache of interviewing?  Going through the heartache of not hearing back after an interview. 

Not letting a person know they are not a fit is one of the worst things an interviewer can do.  It is inconsiderate of applicant’s time, possible travel expenses, and feelings.  People put a lot of thought and heart into getting ready for an interview.  It is also very unprofessional.  The world is smaller than we think, and a bad reputation can make its way through the ranks, which can deplete a hiring manager’s applicant pool. 

I know human resources is a busy beehive of activity.  However, with today’s technology and word processing options, sending out emails or setting up a mail merge for rejection letters is fairly quick and efficient.  There really is no reason at all not to let someone know they will not be moving on in the application process. 

What to do if you are ever in a position of waiting on pins and needles to hear back from a company?  I thought you would never ask.

Vanna, if you please . . .

1.  Ask up front what their timeline is.  When it comes time during the interview for you to get to know the company and what they expect, simply ask, “What is your timeframe for making a hiring decision?”  It’s simple and to the point.  They may not have a definite date, e.g. “We should know by next Wednesday.”  But, they should at least be able to give an approximation, such as, “We have more interviews later this week, so we hope to move to the second round of interviews by the first part of next week.”

2.  Give them time to follow-up.  Is it possible they may have come to a decision earlier than expected?  Sure.  It is it your responsibility to call every day to see if they have?  No.  My general rule of thumb is to give them until they say they were going to follow-up and wait another week.  I know that sounds like torture.  Sometimes unforeseen things come up.  Sometimes there are lengthy hiring processes that preclude them from calling a hiring decision back right away.  Before you go in guns a-blazing, make sure you give them the benefit of the doubt. 

3.  Follow up.  There are different schools of thought on this.  More “hiring pundits” are shifting towards encouraging applicants to e-mail a follow-up.  Part of me agrees with this because it avoids putting the hiring manager or human resources, who may have no control on the process at that point, in an awkward position.  It also gives you a paper trail with a time and date stamp so you can keep track of correspondence.  The one downfall is this can be an easy way for a hiring manager to ignore your e-mail.   

If you’re going to call, don’t call repeatedly until you get a live person to talk to.  It is very rare to find a company who doesn’t have caller i.d..  If whomever you are calling doesn’t answer, leave a brief and professional voicemail, and leave it at that.  One thing that I always like to do is write out what I say because I tend to have cotton-mouth when I am calling for a status update.  Again, be brief and professional.  “Hi, _______.  My name is ______ and I interviewed for the ________ position last week.  I just wanted to touch base with you to see if any decision has been made regarding the position.”  Short.  Simple.  Succinct.

4.  Stay busy.  Just because you interviewed, and it seemingly went well, that doesn’t mean you should stop your search.  A new job isn’t yours until a signed job offer is in your hand.  Don’t let another great opportunity slip through your fingers because you assume you have a job in the bag. 

5.  Never let your emotions get the best of you.  Don’t burn bridges by firing off a nasty email about how you no longer want to work at such a callous company or yell at a hiring manager about how he or she shouldn’t leave such a great candidate waiting.  I know it is frustrating, but you never know what your career may bring.  You may want to apply with them again.  Also, networking connections can be built in every situation.  It may not have worked for this position, but you might have been considered for a possibility down the line.  Keep the relationship positive even though you’re feeling pretty negative.

6.  Be prepared for the worst case scenario.  You may get ahold of someone directly, and they may tell you no.  As harsh as it may sound, be careful what you wish for. 

Hiring is not a perfect process.  Hiring managers are not perfect people.  Just remember that you deserve a company who is going to be considerate of your time and effort.  Waiting is hard.  Rejection is harder.  You’ll get through it, though!

Positive Thought of the Day:

“To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart.” – Donald Laird

“You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.” -James D. Miles

Happy Thursday, Friends!! You know what that means: Friday is less than 24 hours away.

One element of interviewing that is not covered nearly enough is bad interviewer behavior. Yes, I could fill the Internet up with stories of interviewees and their egregious acts. While interviewing you need to be the best version of you.

This notion does not let interviewers off the hook, though. Just because you are, essentially, in a position of power that doesn’t mean you can treat people poorly. In the upcoming posts we’ll go over poor interviewer conduct and how to handle it.

Until then, here’s to the Almost-Weekend! *raises red Swingline stapler in the air*

Positive Thought of the Day:

“Dignity consists not in possessing honors, but in the consciousness that we deserve them.” -Aristotle